The Hill: Top 5 House Primaries to Watch

Mass.-06
Incumbent: Rep. John Tierney (D)

Tierney already has a Republican target on his back, but the scandal swirling around his family and his small win margin in 2012 have given fellow Democrats reason to take notice as well.

One Democrat, local businessman and former Marine Seth Moulton, has already jumped in the race, and another, onetime Senate candidate and attorney Marisa DeFranco is "taking a very strong look" at running.

One Democrat, local businessman and former Marine Seth Moulton, has already jumped in the race, and another, onetime Senate candidate and attorney Marisa DeFranco is "taking a very strong look" at running.

Moulton is untested and relatively unknown, but his profile makes him the type of candidate that Democrats would love to have run — if not necessarily in a contested primary. He's brought big Democratic guns to his campaign — Joe Trippi, who managed Howard Dean's 2004 presidential bid, and Max Glass, campaign manager for Rep. Tulsi Gabbard (D-Hawaii) — an indication he's taking the race seriously, and not just running to raise his profile for future political plans.

DeFranco ran a lackluster 2012 Senate primary campaign, and after struggling to raise money she was steamrolled at the state party convention by then-candidate Elizabeth Warren, who took more than 90 percent of the vote for the party's nomination.

The DCCC has placed Tierney on their Frontline program, which offers its most vulnerable Democratic incumbents fundraising and operational help — but they issued that protection with a likely rematch between Tierney and Republican Richard Tisei in mind.

It remains to be seen whether the party apparatus will defend him in what could be a fierce primary.

If DeFranco decides to run, she could split the anti-Tierney vote and offer the incumbent a pathway back to the nomination.

But observers expect more details to emerge from Tierney's family's scandal, which centers on an offshore gambling ring. A steady drip of bad news for the incumbent could seriously jeopardize his bid for reelection even before the general campaign begins.

Read the original Hill article here.